pariswasawoman:

Sylvia von Harden (March 28, 1894 – June 4, 1963), also called Sylvia von Halle, was a German journalist and poet. During her career as a journalist, she wrote for many newspapers in Germany and England. She is perhaps best known as the subject of a painting by Otto Dix.
Born Sylvia Lehr, von Harden (she chose the name as an aristocratic pseudonym) wrote a literary column for the monthly Das junge Deutschland from 1918 to 1920, and wrote for Die Rote Erde from 1919 to 1923. From 1915 to 1923, she lived with the writer Ferdinand Hartkopf, with whom she had a son. During the 1920s she lived in Berlin, and published two volumes of poetry in 1920 and 1927.
She was famously portrayed in Otto Dix's painting entitled Portrait of the Journalist Sylvia von Harden (1926). An ambivalent image of the New Woman, it depicts von Harden with bobbed hair and monocle, seated at a cafe table with a cigarette in her hand and a cocktail in front of her. This painting is recreated in an opening scene of the film Cabaret.
In 1959, von Harden wrote an article, “Erinnerungen an Otto Dix” (“Memories of Otto Dix”), in which she described the genesis of the portrait. Dix had met her on the street, and declared:

'I must paint you! I simply must! … You are representative of an entire epoch!''So, you want to paint my lacklustre eyes, my ornate ears, my long nose, my thin lips; you want to paint my long hands, my short legs, my big feet—things which can only scare people off and delight no-one?''You have brilliantly characterized yourself, and all that will lead to a portrait representative of an epoch concerned not with the outward beauty of a woman but rather with her psychological condition.'

The painting, an important example of the New Objectivity movement, is now in the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.
(source: Wikipedia)

pariswasawoman:

Sylvia von Harden (March 28, 1894 – June 4, 1963), also called Sylvia von Halle, was a German journalist and poet. During her career as a journalist, she wrote for many newspapers in Germany and England. She is perhaps best known as the subject of a painting by Otto Dix.

Born Sylvia Lehr, von Harden (she chose the name as an aristocratic pseudonym) wrote a literary column for the monthly Das junge Deutschland from 1918 to 1920, and wrote for Die Rote Erde from 1919 to 1923. From 1915 to 1923, she lived with the writer Ferdinand Hartkopf, with whom she had a son. During the 1920s she lived in Berlin, and published two volumes of poetry in 1920 and 1927.

She was famously portrayed in Otto Dix's painting entitled Portrait of the Journalist Sylvia von Harden (1926). An ambivalent image of the New Woman, it depicts von Harden with bobbed hair and monocle, seated at a cafe table with a cigarette in her hand and a cocktail in front of her. This painting is recreated in an opening scene of the film Cabaret.

In 1959, von Harden wrote an article, “Erinnerungen an Otto Dix” (“Memories of Otto Dix”), in which she described the genesis of the portrait. Dix had met her on the street, and declared:

'I must paint you! I simply must! … You are representative of an entire epoch!'
'So, you want to paint my lacklustre eyes, my ornate ears, my long nose, my thin lips; you want to paint my long hands, my short legs, my big feet—things which can only scare people off and delight no-one?'
'You have brilliantly characterized yourself, and all that will lead to a portrait representative of an epoch concerned not with the outward beauty of a woman but rather with her psychological condition.'

The painting, an important example of the New Objectivity movement, is now in the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges PompidouParis.

(source: Wikipedia)

etclibrarian:

Template of the Sanford Berman button for those who want one. These fit a 2 1/4 inch button.

etclibrarian:

Template of the Sanford Berman button for those who want one. These fit a 2 1/4 inch button.

893thecurrent:

After 15-plus years as Burnsville’s acclaimed community youth center, the Garage will transition to a nonprofit music venue in 2015.
Under the direction of Twin Cities Catalyst Music Inc., the Garage will evolve from a city-run community center into what Adams calls an “all-ages music laboratory.” Maintaining their mission of hands-on creativity, the venue will soon host a first-class recording studio. In addition to weekly concerts, artists and fans alike will have access to the studio for recording and lessons in sound production.
read more

893thecurrent:

After 15-plus years as Burnsville’s acclaimed community youth center, the Garage will transition to a nonprofit music venue in 2015.

Under the direction of Twin Cities Catalyst Music Inc., the Garage will evolve from a city-run community center into what Adams calls an “all-ages music laboratory.” Maintaining their mission of hands-on creativity, the venue will soon host a first-class recording studio. In addition to weekly concerts, artists and fans alike will have access to the studio for recording and lessons in sound production.

read more

"When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women."
-

Sally Kempton

I feel this is very important.

(via yourenotsylviaplath)

It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them.

(via lepetitmortpourmoi)

"Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted."

(via misandry-mermaid)

(via awoodenbird)

On Depression & Getting Help

This was originally posted February 26, 2010.


I deal with suicidal, unipolar depression and I take medication daily to treat it. Over the past seven years, I’ve had two episodes that were severe and during which I thought almost exclusively of suicide. I did not eat much and lost weight during…

Important.